Motorcycle Helmet Safety Standards 101

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I know you almost feel like you have just entered into a physics class. Worry not, I won’t use all the complicated lingo here.

As a rider, you need to know what the helmet safety standards mean so you can make an informed decision when picking one. Being in the motorcycle import industry has taught me a thing or two about helmets.

Currently, traffic rules are strict on anyone who rides on a motorcycle without a helmet. It’s fatal not to wear one and we don’t need to get into the stats of thousands of casualties. A poorly made helmet can send you to brain damage. Any part of your body can get injured yet you survive. But a slight head concussion is alarming.

If a helmet isn’t functional, then you are endangering your life.

Helmet safety ratings

There are a bunch of stickers at the back of your helmet that show different certifications.

DOT: The U.S. Department of Transportation determines this standard. Any helmet should meet the federal standard FMVSS 218 which is the effective DOT standard. Manufacturers are expected to test their helmets for field vision, penetration resistance, and impact negation among others.

ECE: The Economic Commission for Europe sets these standards. Helmets must meet the current ECE 22.05 standard. It is used by over 50 countries in Europe. Manufactures carry out impact testing, optics quality, designs to improve survival during crushes, etc.

SNELL: These are the standards set by the Snell Memorial Foundation. It’s a voluntary test carried out by some racing bodies for their riders. For street purposes, SNELL M2015 should be maintained while SA2015 for races. It is the most aggressive impact testing as it involved edge anvils. It features ease of removal, face shield rigidity against shattering, and helmet stability.

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest